Sunday, August 24, 2008

What is Spinal decompression therapy?

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What Is Decompression Therapy?
Decompression Therapy, or otherwise known as spinal decompression therapy, is the non-surgical neck and lower back pain remedy. Generally, back pains are caused by degenerative disc disease, herniated disc, spinal stenosis or other disc deformities.

With spinal decompression therapy, the patient avoids surgery and only undergoes several therapy sessions. Most patients attest to instant back pain relief even after the first decompresion therapy session.


Common Back Pain Remedies
Almost everyone has experienced back pain at one time or another. It was said, that back pain comes in 2nd to headache as the most common neurological disorder in the U.S.

Because of its prevalence, people resorted to various back pain remedies. Some remedies are really effective, others just make their conditions much worse. Some of the most common remedies to alleviate back pain are:

Acupuncture - treatment is cheap but some people dread the idea of needles puncturing their skin.
Taking in vitamin D, B12 or magnesium - this remedy is more of preventive in nature. If the patient suffers severe lower back pain, this remedy may help in some ways but it will not completely remove the problematic back pain.
Yoga - this back pain remedy is excellent for those that are still flexible and have the time to attend regular sessions spanning at least 6 months. It is not for the sickly, weakly, elderly types.
Massage therapy - undergoing a massage therapy is very soothing and stress-releasing. But for severe back problems and under untrained therapists, it may aggravate the problem and it may worsen the condition.
Surgery - not everyone wants to go under the knife and it could also be very expensive and, at times, debilitating.
Spinal decompression therapy - a patient is firmly placed on a secured but padded spinal decompression table. The table then slowly adjusts the vertebrae causing the back pain problem. Immediate relief is often experienced by the patient. It is safe, effortless and painless way to remedy back pain problems.



Spinal Decompression Is Non-Surgical
Traditionally, people treat back disorders with oral medication, physical therapy, exercises and spinal surgery. With the latest development in technology and cutting-edge device, spinal decompression is the best option that allows you to say goodbye to your back pain and avoid the need for that debilitating surgery.

A spinal decompression table program provides a non-invasive treatment option for most chronic back pain problems and allows patients to become active & healthy individuals again.
DRX 9000
NYC Chiropractor,spinal decompression specialist,Herniated disc, slipped disc, pinched nerve

What is a Pinched nerve? Pinched nerve NYC


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What is a pinched nerve? In our NYC integrated medical center we utilize spinal decompression therapy, physical therapy and medical care to not only alleviate signs and symptoms but correct the problem without surgery.

A pinched nerve is a nerve with pressure applied to it. In the spine, a pinched nerve is usually caused by a herniated disk or herniated disc pressing on it.

Symptoms of a pinched nerve are:

weakness
tenderness
prickly sensation
stabbing sensation
burning sensation

Pinched nerves in the spine tend to happen in the neck and low back as these are the areas that do the most moving, and often refer pain down the leg or arm. Pinched nerves can be brought on by hard physical work and injury.

Sciatica is a symptom, characterized by pain down one leg, and brought about when the largest nerve in the body, the sciatic nerve, is irritated.
What is Sciatica and what are the symptoms?
Answer:

Pain, numbness and/or weakness down the leg are the main symptoms of sciatica.

Sciatic pain is generally most noticeable as pain that radiates from the buttock area down the leg. Pain is usually on one side of the body, not both. Initially, sciatic pain is mild and grows in intensity - sometimes to unbearable levels - over time. There is usually little or no pain in the low back (although sciatica originates in the low back).

Nerve pain, such as a mild ache, and/or sharp, burning, tingling or electrical sensations, is caused by irritation to the sciatic nerve.

Worsening of symptoms may be brought about by coughing, sneezing, laughing and similar reflexive actions. Sciatica symptoms also tend to become worse if you sit for long periods of time. This is due to the pressure sitting puts on the nerve, which irritates it. Symptoms of sciatica also may worsen after long periods of lying on the irritated area, and after long periods of walking.

Numbness or weakness of the leg or foot is another symptom of sciatica. Should weakness of the leg or foot get progressively worse, and/or if there is a loss of control or feeling of the bowels or bladder, you may have a serious condition called cauda equina syndrome. Seek medical attention immediately.

Sources:
Kendall, F., McCreary, E., & Provance, P. (1993). Muscles: Testing and Function with Posture and Pain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.
Wheeless' Book of Orthopaedics. Retrieved January 10, 2007, from Duke Orthopaedics Web site: http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/sciatic_nerve

Saturday, August 16, 2008

NYC spinal decompression NYC

NYC Spinal decompression NYC

Solution for Herniated disc without surgery
as seen on http://solution-health-aleni.blogspot.com/2008/05/solution-for-herniated.html
Spinal decompression is proving to be a great last resort before surgery. The procedure may also help with failed back surgeries. According to two recent studies in the New England Journal of Medicine, back surgery is often not necessary for back pain, Spinal Decompression and non-surgical treatments can relieve some of the suffering. Neurosurgeon Wilco C. Peul, MD, head of the spine intervention study group at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, led a study of 283 patients with confirmed cases of severe sciatica. The study found that 95 percent reported recovery after one year, whether or not they had surgery. “Americans have back surgery Dr. Steven Shoshany, Spinal Decompression Specialist twice as much as people in other countries,” said Dr. Shoshany. “1.5 million disc operations are done worldwide each year, but surprisingly many of these operations do not need to happen. Non-surgical treatments have been proven to be just as effective.” Spinal decompression causes a decompression to the spine that sucks the disc material back into the disc and brings fresh blood flow to the area, while helping with the healing process. An exam and MRI will determine the level of treatment for each patient and Dr. Shoshany said patients are usually back to their daily activities within two to three weeks after treatment. "What's interesting is that more and more studies point to the fact that back surgery should be a last resort when all other methods have failed," said Dr. Shoshany. “For anyone considering surgery to get rid of back pain, this is a healthy alternative treatment they may want to consider.” Spinal Decompression is FDA cleared and a well-documented treatment; it is a safe and effective treatment for herniated discs.
www.drshoshany.com

Monday, August 11, 2008

Solution for herniated discs

Solution for Herniated disc without surgery
as seen on http://solution-health-aleni.blogspot.com/2008/05/solution-for-herniated.html
Spinal decompression is proving to be a great last resort before surgery. The procedure may also help with failed back surgeries. According to two recent studies in the New England Journal of Medicine, back surgery is often not necessary for back pain, Spinal Decompression and non-surgical treatments can relieve some of the suffering. Neurosurgeon Wilco C. Peul, MD, head of the spine intervention study group at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, led a study of 283 patients with confirmed cases of severe sciatica. The study found that 95 percent reported recovery after one year, whether or not they had surgery. “Americans have back surgery Dr. Steven Shoshany, Spinal Decompression Specialist twice as much as people in other countries,” said Dr. Shoshany. “1.5 million disc operations are done worldwide each year, but surprisingly many of these operations do not need to happen. Non-surgical treatments have been proven to be just as effective.” Spinal decompression causes a decompression to the spine that sucks the disc material back into the disc and brings fresh blood flow to the area, while helping with the healing process. An exam and MRI will determine the level of treatment for each patient and Dr. Shoshany said patients are usually back to their daily activities within two to three weeks after treatment. "What's interesting is that more and more studies point to the fact that back surgery should be a last resort when all other methods have failed," said Dr. Shoshany. “For anyone considering surgery to get rid of back pain, this is a healthy alternative treatment they may want to consider.” Spinal Decompression is FDA cleared and a well-documented treatment; it is a safe and effective treatment for herniated discs.

Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Make Back Pain Disappear Without Drugs or Scalpel

Make Back Pain Disappear Without Drugs or Scalpel
Spinal Decompression Is a Magical Cure for Some People

reprinted from Daily Health News, November 1, 2007
URL: http://www.bottomlinesecrets.com/blpnet/article.html?article_id=43340

Luckily I've never suffered a serious bout of back pain -- and staying strong in the hope I won't have problems like that is one reason I am so committed to fitness. Even so, though, the truth is that most of us (80% by some estimates) will have back pain at some time or another -- whether from over-exertion, injury or simply a result of the aging process. Chronic back pain is frustrating, not only because of how badly it hurts but also because it can be difficult to cure. It is the fifth most common reason for doctor visits.

A particularly common cause of such pain is a herniated disk, also referred to colloquially as a "slipped disk." For a long time, the usual mainstream medical solutions were surgery, physical therapy and/or pain medication, all of which take a long time and may not work for everyone. So I was very interested to learn about a non-surgical, non-invasive treatment for herniated disks called spinal decompression.

Visualize the disks in your back as being like hard donuts filled with a jelly-like material in the center. With age, the strong fibrous cartilage (the donut) can weaken, allowing the jelly-like material (nucleus pulposus) to bulge, which in and of itself is not painful. But more seriously, with a herniated disk the hard tissue has actually torn or ruptured, causing this material to ooze and press on spinal nerves. This causes pain that can range from mild to horrible.

SPINAL DECOMPRESSION 101: A PRIMER

One of the first devices used for spinal decompression was approved by the FDA in 1995. Because spinal decompression requires special expertise and pricey equipment, few chiropractors have offered this treatment -- but numbers are growing as training and better insurance reimbursement becomes more commonplace, I was told by Steven Shoshany, DC, a New York City-based chiropractor who specializes in spinal decompression.

Here's how it works: The patient lies on a comfortable table made specifically for this purpose, comfortably strapped down with a pelvis and torso harness that resembles a girdle. Calling it a "high-tech traction device," Dr. Shoshany explained how it works. "Slowly and comfortably, almost imperceptibly, the machine creates traction by pulling and holding for one minute. Then, intermittently, it releases. It is believed that this creates a negative pressure, or a vacuum within the disk, which then draws back the herniated-disk material which was displaced." With less pressure inside the disk, and thus less on the spinal nerves, pain often decreases or might even disappear -- sometimes instantaneously. To "fix the hold," however, numerous sessions may be required.

This technique also allows nutrient-rich fluid to go to the area where there is less pressure, stimulating the healing process. Most patients either sleep or watch a DVD during the treatment, Dr. Shoshany told me. Each session takes about 30 minutes and a typical treatment program may take between 20 to 30 sessions.

Critics contend that there are no long-range, well-designed studies looking at efficacy over time, but there has been some research on the treatment and the results are promising. In one study published in 2001 in Neurological Research, researchers reported that a spinal decompression therapy called VAX-D produced a success rate of 68.4%, compared with 0% for a placebo therapy in treatment of chronic low back pain. Another study from a team of researchers at the University of Illinois and Rome found a 71% success rate for treatment of herniated disk and other causes of low back pain, with "success" defined as a reduction in pain to 0 or 1 on a scale of 0 to 5.

NOT FOR EVERYONE

Dr. Shoshany noted that some people get much more benefit from spinal decompression than others, and it is not an option for everyone. "It's not a good choice for a person who has metal implants in the spine," he warned. It's better for people with a single-disk herniation than those who have herniation in several or all of them. Also, people who are morbidly obese and/or who smoke likely won't find much relief from spinal decompression either.

The procedure is thought to be safe, though there is no hard science supporting its efficacy. If you do decide to seek out this somewhat unconventional form of treatment, it's safest and best to do so with the oversight of your orthopedic surgeon, who can help you ascertain whether it might work in your case. For more information on spinal decompression, go to www.drshoshany.com



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Steven Shoshany, DC, a New York City-based chiropractor who specializes in spinal decompression. He can be reached through his Web site, www.drshoshany.com

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Tuesday, August 5, 2008

Spinal decompression therapy

www.drshoshany.com More and more patients are learning the benefits of spinal decompression therapy. Just the other day I saw a commercial on cable on Channel 35 in Manhattan for Manhattan Spine. This was a nice infomercial educating patients about the benefits of this treatment. I believe the title of the program is "Back pain Breakthrough"courtesy of National Spine Centers. The spinal decompression protocols utilize the DRX 9000 and a Rehabilitative method.I offer this fantastic treatment in my Manhattan herniated disc treatment facility. The doctor in the video is Dr. Crespo, he is a MD that adopted the DRX 9000 spinal decompression protocol into his approach. Dr. Crespo even calls his program the Crespo method. If you are searching for a comprehensive herniated disc treatment in Manhattan consider treatment at Living well medical this is my newest and most comprehensive facility to date. We have a MD onsite his name is Dr. Arnold Blank he specializes in Pain Management for the past 20 years and is a expert in non-surgical pain relief methods and utilizes both traditional medical approaches and alternative pain relief methods. This recent addition to our practice allows us to more effectivelty deal with patients that are in pain. Our Physical therapy department utilizes the newest and most technologically advanced equipment. Like the Spine Force, Power Plate, Cold laser therapy. Of course we offer Chiropractic care, Medical massage and acupuncture.
video

Friday, August 1, 2008

Herniated disc nyc














Spinal decompression NYC
Herniated disc treatment NYC
www.drshoshany.com

Herniated Disc -
What is a herniated disc?
The bones (vertebrae) that form the spine in your back are cushioned by small, spongy discs. When these discs are healthy, they act as shock absorbers for the spine and keep the spine flexible. But when a disc is damaged, it may bulge or break open. This is called a herniated disc. It may also be called a slipped or ruptured disc.

You can have a herniated disc in any part of your spine. But most herniated discs affect the lower back (lumbar spine). Some happen in the neck (cervical spine) and, more rarely, in the upper back (thoracic spine). This topic focuses mainly on the lower back.
What causes a herniated disc?
A herniated disc may be caused by:
• Wear and tear of the disc. As you age, your discs dry out and aren't as flexible.
• Injury to the spine. This may cause tiny tears or cracks in the hard outer layer of the disc. When this happens, the gel inside the disc can be forced out through the tears or cracks in the outer layer of the disc. This causes the disc to bulge, break open, or break into pieces.
What are the symptoms?
When a herniated disc presses on nerve roots, it can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in the area of the body where the nerve travels. A herniated disc in the lower back can cause pain and numbness in the buttock and down the leg. This is called sciatica (say "sy-AT-ih-kuh"). Sciatica is the most common symptom of a herniated disc in the low back.
If a herniated disc is not pressing on a nerve, you may have a backache or no pain at all.
If you have weakness or numbness in both legs, along with loss of bladder or bowel control, seek medical care right away. This could be a sign of a rare but serious problem called cauda equina syndrome.
How is a herniated disc diagnosed?
Your doctor may diagnose a herniated disc by asking questions about your symptoms and examining you. If your symptoms clearly point to a herniated disc, you may not need tests.
Sometimes a doctor will do tests such as an MRI or a CT scan to confirm a herniated disc or rule out other health problems.
How is it treated?
Symptoms from a herniated disc usually get better in a few weeks or months. To help you recover:
• Rest if you have severe pain. Otherwise, stay active. Walking and other light activity may help.
• Use ice or a cold pack on the area for 10 to 15 minutes, 3 times a day. Put a thin cloth between the ice and your skin. Heat relieves pain for some people, but you should wait 2 or 3 days after an injury to use it.
• Do the exercises that your doctor or physical therapist suggests. These will help keep your back muscles strong and prevent another injury.
• Ask your doctor about medicine to treat your symptoms. Medicine won't cure a herniated disc, but it may help with pain and swelling.
Usually a herniated disc will heal on its own over time. About half of people with a herniated disc get better within 1 month, and most are better after 6 months.1 Only about 1 person in 10 still has enough pain after 6 weeks to think about surgery.2
Be patient, and stick with your treatment. If your symptoms don't get better in a few months, you may want to talk to your doctor about surgery.
Can a herniated disc be prevented?
After you have hurt your back, you are more likely to have back problems in the future. To help keep your back healthy:
• Protect your back when you lift. For example, lift with your legs, not your back. Don't bend forward at the waist when you lift. Bend your knees and squat.
• Use good posture. When you stand or walk, keep your shoulders back and down, your chin back, and your belly in. This will help support your lower back.
• Get regular exercise.
• Stay at a healthy weight. This may reduce the load on your lower back.
• Don't smoke. Smoking increases the risk of a disc injury
Herniated Disc - Cause
A herniated disc usually is caused by wear and tear of the disc (also called disc degeneration). As we age, our vertebral discs lose some of the fluid that helps them maintain flexibility. A herniated disc also may result from injuries to the spine, which may cause tiny tears or cracks in the outer layer (annulus or capsule) of the disc. The jellylike material inside the disc (nucleus) may be forced out through the tears or cracks in the capsule, which causes the disc to bulge, break open (rupture), or break into fragments. See an illustration of a herniated disc .
Injury to the disc can occur from:
• A sudden heavy strain or increased pressure to the lower back. Sometimes a sudden twisting movement or even a sneeze will force some of the nucleus (the material inside the disc) out through the disc's outer layer (annulus or capsule).
• Activities that are done over and over again that may stress the lower back, including poor lifting habits, prolonged exposure to vibration, or sports-related injuries

Spinal Decompression treatment has been proven to be an effective treatment for Herniated disc.
Visit www.drshoshany.com for Spinal decompression treatment in Manhattan.